BILLY RAY ROBERTS

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  • BILLY RAY ROBERTS
    BILLY RAY ROBERTS
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Billy Ray Roberts, age 84, entered his heavenly reward on October 6th, 2020. He joined the ranks of the cloud of witnesses to continue his watch over our family with even greater clarity and strength. A Celebration of Life Service will be held on Saturday, October 24th, 2020 at 2pm. River City Church 3015 N. Robinson Drive Waco, Texas 76706. You may view the full obituary at www.cliftonfh.com.

Billy was born on April 26th, 1936 in Bell County, Texas to Claude Lee and Cora Bell Roberts. On August 22nd, 1959 he married Genova Jean Benefield. Two children were born to this union, Donna Jill and Sandy Lynn.

He was preceded in death by his parents, two brothers, and son-in-law, Bill Edwards, husband of Jill. He is survived by his wife, Jean Roberts of Clifton; daughter, Donna Jill Edwards of San Antonio; daughter Sandy Lynn Dool and husband Rev. Richard Dool of Waco; grandchildren, Angel Plemons and husband Rev. Carey Plemons of Selma; Anthony Edwards of Robinson; Rev. Brittney Dool of Clifton; Rev. Colton Dool of Waco; and great granddaughter Astrid Plemons of Selma. He is survived by 3 brothers and 5 sisters; along with a host of nieces, nephews, extended church family and friends.

From an early age, Billy was a hard worker. In 1963 he began working at Wilson’s Moulding in Clifton which became what is known today as Clifton Moulding. He was among the first handicapped individuals to be hired in the moulding plant. He retired as a Foreman, after 29 years of service. He set high expectations for those who worked for him and in turn he was loyal to the needs and concerns they had. They would do anything for him because he was just and fair.

In 1962, He was baptised in JESUS NAME in Belton, Texas and received the HOLY GHOST during a revival in Meridian in 1965. He wanted everyone to experience JESUS in this same way, so he began to witness and hold Bible Studies. In the days before seatbelt laws, the station wagon he owned would have as many as 14 people in it at one time. Once he became wheelchair bound he would still drive mother to do weekly visitations and pick up people for church until January of this year. Due his love for the

Due his love for the LORD, he and his family learned to spend time in Daily Prayer, Bible reading and Biblical devotions that are not a ritual. They were times of growth in the Spirit and communing with the ONE he Adored. He believed in tithing his time, talent, and increase for what one gives to GOD is what will last. He had a Heart of Sacrifice; was the epitome of Faithfulness and Stewardship; and had a Commitment to Prayer and Fasting, with great Faith and Trust in GOD. He knew how to Praise the LORD in all things whether good or bad. Even though he made his request known to GOD in prayer, he always prayed “LORD, NOT MY WILL, BUT THINE BE DONE.”

All of these attributes lead him to have a love for the people of Mexico and he always gave sacrificially to Foreign Missions. He gave funds for a church to be built and purchased two burros for the missionaries to travel where a vehicle could not carry them. From the 1960’s until now he invested his time, talent and offerings, desiring to be a part of ministry and help build churches. A few of the locations are Clifton, Hillsboro, Snyder, and Lacy Lakeview. He used his own funds and skills to complete the work. Being crippled and having polio did not hinder him from climbing ladders, swinging hammers and sitting on roof trusses.

He also took time to assist Jean in preparing the banana nut bread she made each week even driving her on her routes. This money was used for the church and for people in need. When someone in need asked for assistance he never turned them away empty handed.

Over the past few days as people have called they have spoken of the twinkle in his eyes, his smile, his consistency, his kindness and goodness. He was the same no matter where you saw him. Even as time advanced the years and his mobility became limited his spirit and humor never dampened. He was a man of few words, who believed a man’s word was his most valuable possession. His handshake was his bond