Columns/Opinions

Wed
29
Oct

Campaign final push, election day nears

by Ed Sterling
 
Polls continued to show Republican candidates ahead in top-of-ballot races as Texas moved closer to the Oct. 31 early voting deadline before Election Day, Nov. 4. Political campaigns continued to work feverishly across Texas, knocking on doors, holding rallies, robocalling, planting signs, flooding mailboxes and barraging email accounts.
 
Wed
29
Oct

Tribe paid high price for befriending Texans

By Bartee Haile

A surprise attack by four hostile tribes on Oct. 25, 1862, cut the number of Tonkawas in half leaving less than 150 still alive and kicking. Half a dozen small groups of native peoples based in Central Texas banded together in the early seventeenth century. Even though this new tribe called themselves Tickanwatick, a tongue-twister meaning “the most human of men,” in time they came to be known as the Tonkawa, Waco for “they all live together.”
 
Wed
22
Oct

Gismos & whatchamacallits

Anyone who has ever dealt with an officious bean-counter will appreciate a story D.B. Wright used to tell. It happened in Venezuela in the mid-1950s, but it just as easily could have played out in Houston, Port Arthur, Midland or some warehouse in the Eagle Ford production in South Texas. And even though this story took place in South America, Texas-based oil workers filled the key roles.
 
Wed
22
Oct

High court allows voter ID law for upcoming election

By Ed Sterling

With early voting in Texas only days away, the U.S. Supreme Court on Oct. 18 let stand a U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals order, thereby allowing Texas’ 2011 voter identification law to remain in force for the time being. Civil rights plaintiffs in Veasey et al. v. Perry et al. sought to have portions of the law declared unenforceable on constitutional grounds. In a Corpus Christi federal courtroom, U.S. District Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos struck down the law and ordered the state to return to election law practices in place before the Legislature passed the law in 2011.
Wed
15
Oct

Supreme sacrifice

At first glance, the old high school annual looks like any vintage yearbook. In the traditional style of secondary school publications, it has a puffed, embossed cover. The rope-like typeface, once gilt-covered, says “Round Up.” The Western motive continues with an artful image of a saddled horse bowing its head as if nosing a high-crowned cowboy hat. Nearby is a campfire with red flames.
 
Wed
15
Oct

Front-running candidates appear in broadcast debate forums

By Ed Sterling

An Oct. 9 ruling by U.S. District Judge Nelva Gonzalez Ramos of Corpus Christi prevents the state from enforcing the voter identification law passed by the Texas Legislature in 2011 as Senate Bill 14. In the case, Marc Veasey et al. v. Rick Perry et al., Ramos ruled the law was enacted with a discriminatory purpose and an impermissible discriminatory effect against Hispanics and African-Americans. Ramos said the law places an unconstitutional burden on the right to vote that is, in effect, a poll tax. “Plaintiffs,” she wrote, “have thus demonstrated that every form of SB 14-qualified ID available to the general public is issued at a cost.”
 
Wed
08
Oct

Front-running candidates appear in broadcast debate forums

By Ed Sterling

Texans interested in who their next governor and lieutenant governor will be witnessed major party candidates for those offices engage in live, one-hour broadcast debates last week. Fellow state Sens. Leticia Van de Putte, D-San Antonio, and Dan Patrick, R-Houston, opponents in the race for lieutenant governor, faced off in Austin on Sept. 29. Sen. Wendy Davis, D-Fort Worth, and Republican Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott competed on stage in Dallas on Sept. 30, each striving to succeed longtime Gov. Rick Perry as the state’s chief executive.
 
Wed
08
Oct

November elections won’t resolve anything

by Lee Hamilton

Unless the recent election talk of bipartisanship and finding common ground becomes a reality, dysfunction and lack of productivity in Congress is likely to continue. Members of Congress are home now, campaigning for the upcoming elections. Their messages are all over the map, and for a good reason: they have very little to brag about.
 
Wed
01
Oct

Gearing up 4-H, breast cancer awareness month

We had a great showing at The Showdown on the Bosque in Clifton this past weekend. It was a great time. Thanks to all those involved for working so hard to make it possible. The 4-H year is starting to get into full swing this week with events like showing and judging at the State Fair and The Heart of Texas Fair. Projects, contests, and clubs, including Junior Master Gardeners, Consumer Decision Making, Shooting Sports, and Food Challenge are also starting this month.
 
Wed
01
Oct

Recognize teen dating violence, digital abuse

by Greg Abbott
 
In today’s world, teenagers’ daily activities and social worlds often revolve around cell phones, texting and instant messaging, watching and creating online videos, and social networking sites. While so many of these great technological innovations are positive, there can be risks for teenagers – risks like digital dating abuse. Digital dating abuse is perpetrated when a teenager uses technology like texting and social networking to bully, harass, stalk or intimidate a boyfriend or girlfriend. The most common digital abusive tactics involve utilizing technology to harass a partner’s friends, tamper with a partner’s social networking account, stalk a partner, embarrass a partner or send degrading messages to a partner.
 

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